I used to recommend Office 365 Enterprise E3 as the best bang for the 20 bucks within the realm of Microsoft’s Office 365 offerings. But when Microsoft 365 Business was launched at the same $20 mark in August of 2017, then there was a new kid on the block – and this one had Office 365 Advanced Threat Protection.

 

Office 365 Advanced Threat Protection (ATP) adds important layers to the security stack, such as ATP Safe Links and ATP Safe Attachments. And to round out the trilogy, there’s ATP for SharePoint, OneDrive, and Microsoft Teams.

 

Just to test drive this latter member of the trio, I downloaded a sample virus file and then uploaded that test malware to my OneDrive file repository. I opened the Office portal and navigated to the supposedly-infected file to give it a click. Because I’ve configured an alert for just such a problem, I instantly received an urgent notification:

 

office 365 advanced threat protection

 

Fortunately, this was a harmless test file. But if it were the real thing, then we would take immediate measures.

 

And the file is locked down:

So as much as we have Exchange Online Protection for email scanning and filtering, I’m more than pleased to know that we have built-in security when it comes to Microsoft Teams, SharePoint and OneDrive for Business.

 

 

Too many equate Office 365 with the old Office suite of software and that they now have to pay for it on a constant basis. It is so much more than desktop software – it’s a bundle of software and services meant to enable productivity anywhere and at any time.

 

I’m going to assume that you already know about the legacy apps, such as Outlook, Word, and Excel. But do you use OneNote, OneDrive, Planner, To-Do, Teams or SharePoint? What about Bookings, Flow, Power BI, or Forms?

 

Of these that I’ve listed above, the most productivity might be realized by the adoption of just two: OneNote and Microsoft Teams. And these two apps go hand-in-hand as OneNote can reside within Teams as an integrated app within one of the navigational tabs found across the top of the Teams app.

 

Other Team members can co-author the OneNote Notebook – that is, they can edit the same content at the same time, no matter whether they’re working from the same office space or not. And if they wish to communicate in regard to the content, then members can instantly engage in a one-to-one or one-to-many chat. And that chat can be converted to an audio or audio/video meeting at any time.

 

In truth, OneDrive and SharePoint can be considered part of this mix because when a person shares a document in Microsoft Teams, that document is shared with another Team member from the sharing member’s OneDrive location. And when that document is published to the Files tab in Microsoft Teams, then that file becomes a common item in the document library of the Team in SharePoint. OneNote notebooks are also stored in OneDrive.

 

Microsoft Teams is part of a paradigm shift in the way that we think about online collaboration. The old method of emailing documents as an attachment is wrong on many fronts and warrants another conversation. The modern workplace is mobile and it’s dynamic. And in terms of productivity, there is no comparison to the ability to collaborate in real time from anywhere as we can do in Microsoft Teams.

 

One of the loudest buzzwords heard these days within the business computing environment is SECURITY. And the number one method to prevent a security breach is the use of multi-factor (MFA) or two-step authentication.

 

The most common practice in the MFA arena is to use SMS texting to receive an authentication code. When prompted, you enter the code into the field provided and voilĂ ! The problem with this is that hackers are now SIM swapping or hijacking your mobile phone. When they’re successful, the hackers can request and receive a security code to access your account, lock you out of your own account, and wreak havoc with your life.

 

The best way around this is to use an authenticator app. Google has one, Microsoft has one, and there are popular third-party authenticator apps, such as Authy. They all work with any of your online accounts, but you should find one and use it!

 

As a Microsoft-centric technician, my preference is to use Microsoft Authenticator. It provides security codes for all Microsoft accounts either free and business, Google/Gmail, Reddit, Facebook, and so on. The easiest account to access with Authenticator is your Office 365 account – a balloon pops up on your mobile device and you simply tap it to authenticate.

 

When your devices are managed through Intune and Enterprise, Mobility + Security (EMS), then you have to have permission to use the app first. In my case, the Touch ID biometric thumb reader on my iPhone provides quick access to the Authenticator app itself, as well as access to any other Microsoft apps on the device.

 

It takes some getting used to, however getting hacked is not an option.

 

Scott Abbotts | https://resolute-it.com | https://office365techguy.com